Ungulate Monitoring

A network of camera traps operating 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

A red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag photographed by a camera trap in NPHV

De Hoge Veluwe National Park (henceforth NPHV) is situated in the middle of the Veluwe, a natural area of approximately 100,000 ha in the central part of The Netherlands. The project “Heart of the Veluwe” aims at the strengthening of natural, recreational and landscape values within and in the vicinity of NPHV. Important measures concern the restoration of the landscape around NPHV, which is fragmented by roads and fences. In the project the province of Gelderland cooperates with the cities of Ede, Apeldoorn and Arnhem, and with NPHV and Vereniging Natuurmonumenten.

Two passages for Red deer, Fallow deer, Roe deer and Wild boar have been constructed between the NPHV and adjacent natural areas managed by Vereniging Natuurmonumenten. Animal migration via these new passages may lead to changes in ungulate population size and structure, and alterations in habitat use of these species within the boundaries of NPHV.

The project aims to determine how migration affects the intensity at which ungulates use the available habitats, how this affects plant and animal species associated with these habitats, and how resident ungulate species (in particular Red deer) respond to the immigrants (in particular Fallow deer). Consequences for NPHV staff in terms of time expenditure, and wildlife visibility to the public are also important issues. The project is carried out within the boundaries of NPHV.

Wild Boar (Sus scrofa)

Wild Boar (Sus scrofa)

Roe Deer (capreolus capreolus)

Roe Deer (capreolus capreolus)

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus)

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus)

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus)

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus)

Roe Deer (capreolus capreolus)

Roe Deer (capreolus capreolus)